Where is the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse Going to Hit?

Sunday, July 9, 2017

Where is the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse Going to Hit?

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Will you be able to see the total solar eclipse from you home? Here are the states that will get a chance to see this once-in-a-lifetime sight!!
Where is the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse Going to Hit


On August 21st of 2017, the United States is set to have a Total Solar Eclipse.  This is only the 3rd such eclipse to happen in the last 40 years and only the 1st in almost one hundred years to reach from coast to coast.  The path of totality for this years eclipse will travel through 12 states with many towns and cities in its path.  Depending on your area, you can have anywhere from 30 seconds of viewing to almost 3 minutes!


If you are not in the path of totality, you may want to start calling now because many hotels, motels and campgrounds are already full.  That being said, I do know that many cities are turning their parks into campgrounds so there may still be spots available to rent.

2017 Total Solar Eclipse


So where is the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse going to hit?  Check out this list to see if it is anywhere near you: 
  • Oregon - The US’s first eclipse contact will be Lincoln Beach and that will last for 1 hr 55.  Your best viewing spots will be Dallas (1 min 55 sec), Salem (1 min 54 sec), Mill City (2 min 1 second), Turner (2 min), Madras (2 min 4 sec)
  • Idaho - Some of your best viewing spots will be: Hamer (2 min 14 sec), Clayton (2 min 7 sec), Rexburg (2 min 17 sec), Rigby (2 min 15 sec), Mud Lake (2 min 17 sec), St Anthony (2 min 4 sec)
  • Montana - The eclipse will technically touch down in Montana, but only in a very small area (no roads leading in!) and the totality will last only 45 seconds.
  • Wyoming - Some of your best viewing spots will be: Alta (12 min 16 sec), Glendo (2 min 27 sec), Meadow Acres (2 min 25 sec), Red Butte (2 min 26 sec), Casper (2 min 26 sec)
  • Nebraska - Adams (2 min 29 sec), Arnold (2 min 33 sec), Pawnee City (2 min 36 sec), Grafton (2 min 36 sec), Plymouth (2 min 32 sec), Milligan (2 min 36 sec), York (2 min 20 sec)
  • Kansas - Some of your best viewing spots will be: Leavenworth (1 min 33 sec), Morrill (2 min 35 sec), Denton (2 min 32 seo), Robinson (2 min 35 sec), Severance (2 min 35 sec)
  • Missouri - Westphalia (2 min 19 sec), Wildwood (2 min), New Haven (2 min 32 sec), Fayette (2 min 32 sec), Morrison (2 min 38 sec)
  • Iowa - Yes, the eclipse can be seen from Iowa, but it is a very small area and there are no Iowa cities in the path.  You may be better served taking a road trip!
  • Illinois -Some of the best viewing spots in Illinois will be: Karnak (2 min 28 sec), Stonefort (2 min 30 sec), Coulterville (1 min 55 sec), Kaskaskia (2 min 40 sec)
  • Kentucky - Crofton (2 min 34 sec), Kevil (1 min 57 sec), Smithland (2 min 36 sec), Dawson Springs (2 min 31 sec), Kuttawa (2 min 38 sec), St. Charles (2 min 22 sec)
  • Tennessee - Carthage (2 min 39 sec), Greenbrier (2 min 35 sec), Pleasant View (2 min 18 sec), Cedar Hill (2 min 37 sec), Harriman (2 min 4 sec), Portland (2 min 37 sec), Hartsville (2 min 38 sec), Red Boiling Springs (2 min 3 sec)
  • Georgia - Sky Valley (2 min 38 sec), Demorest (1 min 22 sec), Tallulah Falls (2 min 22 sec)
  • North Carolina - Franklin (2 min 31 sec), Hayesville (2 min 33 sec), Highlands (2 min 33 sec), Hiwassee Lake (2 min 18 sec), Lake Santeetlah (2 min 34 sec), Murphy (2 min 27 sec)
  • South Carolina - Bowman (2 min 15 sec), Johnston (2 min), Rowesville (2 min 6 sec), Bradley (2 min 1 sec), Salem (2 min 36 sec)

*These are not complete lists, there are just highlights of the path of totality in each state.  For a complete list you can go to eclipse2017.org




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